TOM HOLLAND IN THE SHADOW OF THE SWORD EBOOK

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In the Shadow of the Sword is a history book charting the origins of Islam. The author, Tom Holland, had previously written two works on ancient history:Rubicon: The Last Years of the Roman Republic, which charted the fall of the Roman Republic, and Persian Fire, which is an. Editorial Reviews. Review. "Elegantly written A veritable tour de force." The Wall Street In the Shadow of the Sword: The Birth of Islam and the Rise of the Global Arab Empire - site edition by Tom Holland. download a site site eBooks site Unlimited Prime Reading Best Sellers & More site Book Deals Free. In The Shadow Of The Sword: The Battle for Global Empire e mais milhares de eBooks estão disponíveis na Loja site. Ver o eBook site: R$ 25, Leia em qualquer . Tom Holland is a historian of the ancient world and a translator.


Tom Holland In The Shadow Of The Sword Ebook

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Holland, Tom. In the shadow of the sword: the birth of Islam and the rise of the global Arab empire / Tom Holland.—1st U.S. ed. p. cm. Includes bibliographical. In the Shadow of the Sword: The Birth of Islam and the Rise of the Global Arab Empire by Tom Holland. Read online, or download in secure EPUB format. In the Shadow of the Sword by Tom Holland. Read an Excerpt download the Ebook: . Now at last in Tom Holland's In the Shadow of the Sword, they finally have it.

In the Shadow of the Sword: The Birth of Islam and the Rise of the Global Arab Empire

Holland confronts questions in the Quranic text head-on, providing a substantive, fluid exegesis on the original documents. Smoothly composed history and fine scholarship. The emergence of Islam is a notoriously risky subject, so a confident historian who is able to explain where this great religion came from without illusion or dissimulation has us greatly in his debt. I found myself amused, diverted and enchanted by turn. For Tom Holland has an enviable gift for summoning up the colour, the individuals and animation of the past, without sacrificing factual integrity.

He writes with a contagious conviction that history is not only a fascinating tale in itself but is a well-honed instrument with which we can understand our neighbours and our own times, maybe even ourselves.

He modestly compares himself to Edward Gibbon , whom he can call without the slightest fear of contradiction "an infinitely greater historian than myself". Holland seems to have confined himself largely to interpreters, learned or otherwise, writing in English, but his efforts to inform himself, arduous as they may have been, were manifestly insufficient.

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He has written his book in a swashbuckling style that aims more to unsettle his readers than to instruct them. Although that work was depressingly misguided in replacing biblical places with their homonyms in the Arabian peninsula, it at least revealed an accomplished scholar who had gone badly astray.

Holland has read widely, but carelessly. He starts out with an irrelevant, though arresting, account of a defeated Jewish king in Arabian Himyar Yemen killing himself by riding his horse into the Red Sea. It is typical of Holland's style to lead off with this fanciful story when an inscription from the time of the king's death records that the Ethiopians killed him.

Holland explodes with indignation over the traditional term, jahiliyya age of ignorance , for the time before Muhammad. After a tabloid view of Arab culture in that period, he declares: "The effect of this presumption was to prove incalculable.

In the Shadow of the Sword

To this day, even in the west, it continues to inform the way in which the history of the Middle East is interpreted and understood. Research and publication on pre-Islamic history, archaeology, art and languages may be found in many western universities, such as Oxford, as well as in many Arab countries, including Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, and Syria.

The past 30 years have seen lively controversies in the scholarship on early Islam, much of it emanating from the revisionist work of John Wansbrough in analysing the text of the Qur'an and its possible links with both Christian and Jewish language and thought. This is catnip for Holland, as is the revisionist work by Wansbrough's disciple, Andrew Rippin, and, much more idiosyncratically, by the pseudonymous Christoph Luxenberg, who dares not speak his name.

Although these debates are all solidly grounded in close textual study, they can do little more than titillate uninitiated readers because the dust has not yet settled. Praise for In the Shadow of the Sword: His book is elegantly written and refreshingly free from specialist jargon. Marshaling its resources with dexterity, it is a veritable tour de force. Holland—author previously of Rubicon and Persian Fire —is about as exciting a stylist as we have writing history today Holland is a skilful and energetic narrator, and while he guides us along the more intricate twists and turns of the period, he also keeps our eyes on the bigger story.

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Holland confronts questions in the Quranic text head-on, providing a substantive, fluid exegesis on the original documents. Smoothly composed history and fine scholarship. I found myself amused, diverted and enchanted by turn. For Tom Holland has an enviable gift for summoning up the colour, the individuals and animation of the past, without sacrificing factual integrity. He writes with a contagious conviction that history is not only a fascinating tale in itself but is a well-honed instrument with which we can understand our neighbours and our own times, maybe even ourselves.

He is also a divertingly inventive writer with a wicked wit — there's something of both Gibbon and Tom Wolfe in his writingIn the Shadow of the Sword remains a spell-bindingly brilliant multiple portrait of the triumph of monotheism in the ancient world.

Fact is his own scholars whom he tries to revive in his book based Anti Islamic documentary like Crone No morehold to her revisionist opinion about Islam as she did in early s they got large publicity , but thier thoeries were thrown into dustbin by eminent early islamic scholars in west Tom, who adhere to anglicanism insist on superiorty of christian tradion over islamic tradition, which is purely biased and hypocritical.

The Forge of Christendom. Just like the Romans, the Arabs came from nowhere to carve out a stupefyingly vast dominion—except that they achieved their conquests not over the course of centuries as the Romans did but in a matter of decades.

Release Date: Thomas Penn. He is one of the most distinctive prose stylists writing history today, and he drags his tale by the ears, conjuring the half-vanished past with such gusto that characters and places fairly bound from the page.